Connect with us: FacebookTwitter Youtube

Revision (KS5): Sociology

USEFUL REVISION WEBSITES 

Further Reading/Study Support:

Browne, K Sociology for AS AQA Polity 2008
Browne, K et al Sociology for A2 AQA Polity 2009
Haralambos, M and Holborn, M Sociology: Themes and Perspectives Collins Educational 2004 (6th Edition)
Holborn, M and Langley, P Sociology: Themes and Perspectives Student Handbook Collins
Educational 2005
McNeill, P et al AQA Sociology AS Nelson Thornes 2008
McNeill, P et al AQA Sociology A2 Nelson Thornes 2008
Webb, R et al AS level Sociology: The Complete Course for the AQA Specification Napier Press 2008
Webb, R and Trobe, K Succeed at AS Sociology – The Complete Revision Guide for the AQA Specification Napier Press 2009
Webb, R et al A2 level Sociology: The Complete Course for the AQA Specification Napier Press 2009
Sociology Review A Level Magazine : Phillip Allan Updates

General Sociology Revision links:

BBC www.bbc.co.uk
The Daily Telegraph www.telegraph.co.uk
The Government (for details of social policies, etc) www.open.gov.uk
The Guardian www.guardian.co.uk
Market and Opinion Research International (MORI) www.mori.com
Napier Press www.sociology.uk.net
The Observer www.guardian.co.uk
Office for National Statistics www.statistics.gov.uk
Social Science Information Gateway (Sociology) www.sosig.ac.uk/sociology
Sunday Times www.sunday-times.co.uk
The Times www.thetimes.co.uk
Sociology Central www.sociology.org.uk
www.s-cool.co.uk
www.getrevising.co.uk

 

TOP TIPS

REVISION TIPS

Gather essentials- make sure you have easy access to stationary, a quiet space and plenty of paper.

Plan- Make sure you have a revision timetable and a revision checklist (see your teacher).

Know your strengths & weaknesses- Traffic light the areas on your revision checklist and target ‘red’ areas first.

When is the exam?- Know the dates so you can structure your revision equally for both papers.

Know the structure of the exam- Be sure you know how many questions to answer and what an exam paper looks like. Know how the exam questions are marked, especially the weightings of the AOs.

Glossary- compile a key vocabulary glossary complete with up to date examples.
Practice! Answer exam style questions under exam conditions.

Help! Form study support groups; coerce family members into helping and testing you.
Study- little and often rather than once in bulk.

ASK!!!! Email your teachers if you need help, attend revision sessions on offer and never be afraid to ask for extra support.

EXAM TIPS – General

Stick to the suggested timings: Your teacher will have told you what these are for each question on a paper. Sometimes they are also included in the exam paper. Have a watch with you in the exam to help with this if possible!
 
‘Work’ the question first: Highlight key terms from the question and annotate around it what these mean. This will then help you with the planning stage and also ensure that you don’t misunderstand or misread the question.
 
Plan your answers: For longer questions, produce a short plan (such as a list of bullet points or a table). This will help you to organize your thoughts and the examiner will also take it into account when judging the overall quality of your answer, as long as it has not been crossed out.
 
Treat the examiner like your student!: When using key vocabulary make sure you define it. Do not make the assumption that the examiner knows what you are talking about.
 
Use examples: Relevant REAL LIFE examples will bring a lot of marks, especially within longer answers.
 
Use the Item: If a question directs you to use/refer to the item then do so. ‘Work’ this before you start your plan. It will ALWAYS contain relevant ideas that can be included and developed further in your answer.
 
Include the names or studies/research/theorists where possible.
 
Use bullet-point structures (as advised by your class teacher) for shorter answers.

EXAM TIPS- AS

Tips on answering 2 mark questions
 
Write no more than two sentences.
Define all parts of the term (e.g. domestic labour)
Do not use the same words as in the term in your definition (e.g. this is labour that is done in the home).
Include an example at the end of your definition
 
Tips on answering 4 & 6 mark questions
 
Bullet point your answers

Add a brief extension to the bullet point briefly explaining it.

Give reasons that are very different from each other

Give an extra reason if you are unsure of what you have written
 
Tips on answering 12 mark questions
 
Include a brief introduction that picks apart the key terms in the question.
Use x3 PEELE points (see below)
 
Point- have an opening sentence that, if the rest of the paragraph was covered up, the examiner would still get a good idea of how your essay will progress

Explanation of your point

Example/Evidence- Have one example or piece of evidence (eg a study) backing up every main point that you make. Keep the examples /studies as up to date as possible.

Link- This is a concluding sentence within your paragraph showing how what you’ve said in the paragraph relates back to the question. It should often include the word ‘because’.

Evaluation- If you have a SPECIFIC evaluation of the POINT you have just explained, then use it here.
 
Include a brief conclusion
 
Tips on answering 20 & 24 mark questions (excluding Methods in Context)
 
Include a brief introduction that picks apart the key terms in the question.
Use x5 PEELE points (see above)
 
However, if you find this difficult, you can juxtapose the arguments (all the ‘for’ then all the ‘against’).
 
Include a conclusion – be balanced yet decisive – accept that there are good points on both sides of the debate, yet come down more on one side than the other. Don’t say that one side is wholly right (ie the other side has no valid points) as this will rarely, if ever, be true. At the same time don’t hover in between two positions without giving a definite answer. Eg DO NOT SIT ON THE FENCE.
 
Remember the rule of 2/3 and 1/3- you can use alternative arguments as evaluation but these should make up no more than 1/3 of your answer.
 
ANSWER THE QUESTION NOT THE TOPIC!!
 
Tips on answering Methods in Context 20 mark questions

Plan first – brainstorm the PET strengths and limitations of the method

Use the Item – this will have lots of clues regarding the specific issue that you can link to the method

Include X3 strengths and x3 limitations if possible (of which some will practical, some ethical and some theoretical)

Remember the ‘Traffic warden’ test.

EXAM TIPS- A2

Tips on answering 9 mark questions (SCLY3)
 
Lay out your answer using separate bullet points.

You should label each identification point (ID) and each explanation point (EXP)
If I was to cover up your identification point I should be able to guess what it is from the EXP.

Don’t just repeat the ID in your EXP – say how and/or why.

Give three DIFFERENT answers that do not overlap.

Include a fourth ID/EXP if unsure.
 
Tips on answering Methods in Context 15 mark questions (SCLY4)
 
Plan first – brainstorm the PET strengths and limitations of the method.

Use the Item – this will have lots of clues regarding the specific issue that you can link to the method.

Include X3 strengths and x3 limitations if possible (of which some will practical, some ethical and some theoretical).

Remember the ‘Traffic warden’ test.
 
Tips on answering 18, 21 and 33 mark questions (SCLY 3 & 4)
 
Include a brief introduction that picks apart the key terms in the question.

Use the appropriate number of PEELE points (see below) as advised by your teacher for the size of the essay.
 
Point- have an opening sentence that, if the rest of the paragraph was covered up, the examiner would still get a good idea of how your essay will progress.

Explanation of your point

Example/Evidence- Have one example or piece of evidence (eg a study) backing up every main point that you make. Keep the examples /studies as up to date as possible.

Link- This is a concluding sentence within your paragraph showing how what you’ve said in the paragraph relates back to the question. It should often include the word ‘because’.

Evaluation- If you have a SPECIFIC evaluation of the POINT you have just explained, then use it here.
 
Include a conclusion – be balanced yet decisive – accept that there are good points on both sides of the debate, yet come down more on one side than the other. Don’t say that one side is wholly right (ie the other side has no valid points) as this will rarely, if ever, be true. At the same time don’t hover in between two positions without giving a definite answer. Eg DO NOT SIT ON THE FENCE.
 
Remember the rule of 2/3 and 1/3- you can use alternative arguments as evaluation but these should make up no more than 1/3 of your answer.
 
ANSWER THE QUESTION NOT THE TOPIC!!

 

EXAM TERMINOLOGY

 

Assess ‘Weigh up’ a statement, showing arguments in favour and against
Criticise Explain problems, limitations or weaknesses
Define Say what a word or phrase means
Discuss Examine an issue closely, taking account of differing viewpoints
Evaluate Make judgments based on evidence
Examine Investigate closely
Explain Show how or something works, usually by giving a clear and detailed account of it and using examples.
Identify State a relevant reason/factor
Suggest As above
Outline Give a brief account of each different way/view/theory etc

 

WEB LINKS TO PRACTICE PAPERS

AQA Website:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/sociology/as-and-a-level/sociology-2190/past-papers-and-mark-schemes

X