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CRIMINOLOGY

COURSE CONTENT

Criminology is a qualification with elements of psychology, law and sociology that complements studies in humanities.

The first mandatory unit will enable the learner to demonstrate understanding of different types of crime, influences on perceptions of crime and why some crimes are unreported.

The second mandatory unit will allow learners to gain an understanding of why people commit crime, drawing on what they have learned in Unit 1.

The third mandatory unit will provide an understanding of the criminal justice system from the moment a crime has been identified to the verdict. Learners will develop the understanding and skills needed to examine information in order to review the justice of verdicts in criminal cases.

In the final mandatory unit, learners will apply their understanding of the awareness of criminality, criminological theories and the process of bringing an accused to court in order to evaluate the effectiveness of social control to deliver criminal justice policy.

Unit 1 – Changing Awareness of Crime Internal
Unit 2 – Criminological Theories Mandatory External
Unit 3 – Crime Scene to Courtroom Mandatory Internal
Unit 4 – Crime and Punishment Mandatory External

ASSESSMENT

All units are mandatory and are equally weighted at 90 credits per unit. Units 1 and 3 are assessed internally and units 2 and 4 are assessed externally by 2 exams that are 90 minutes each, with 75 marks on each paper. It is graded A* – E.

Entry Requirements

5 GCSE at grade 5 or above. Students must have achieved grade 5 or above in Maths and a 5 in English.

WHY STUDY criminology?

Criminology allows learners to gain the required understanding and skills to be able to consider employment within some aspects of the criminal justice system, e.g. the National Probation Service, the Courts and Tribunals Service or the National Offender Management Service. It also helps develop a number of transferable skills such as independent learning, research and problem solving.

The course is subject to sufficient numbers of students applying

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